Above: Screen capture from Android Porn, one of the DOTMOV 2012 winners.

The DOTMOV Festival Schedule has been announced over at SHIFT (who double up as the festival’s organizers). As usual, the festival will take place at select cities in Asia, North America and Europe.

For the latest information and more details, please see here.…

The winners of DOTMOV 2012 have been selected, and SHIFT will be hosting screenings of the 13 best shorts at locations around the world.

From their press release:

This year’s total submission of works is 194, coming from 16 different countries. The 13 works have been selected by the guest judges. The Screening of these videos on the websites and venues around the world is from November, 2012.

* The screening schedule of each venues will be released on the website from November 2012.

http://www.shift.jp.org/mov/

They have also released the first three shorts for your online consumption pleasure below (starting …

SHIFT is once again accepting submissions for their world wide, digital short film festival. We’ve featured them for several years in a row now, and the results are always impressive!

From their blog:

Online magazine SHIFT presents DOTMOV Festival 2012, a digital film festival aiming to discover talented creators and provide them with an opportunity to show their works. Screening was took place in 20 places, Hong Kong, London, Stockholm, New York, India, Brazil etc besides Japan last year. Works submitted from all over the world will be screened throughout the world venues from November 2012. Last year’s total

Bittersweet Fu (富中作樂) is an illustration lover’s graphic novel. The meticulous hand of its author, Ko Sing, is visible in every page. Whether it’s the distinct character design for each and every background character, or the lovingly rendered interior with the fisheye-lens perspective, Ko’s illustrations draw you in and make you look twice before you turn the page. Composition, perspective and character expressions are all exaggerated to humorous ends. The drawings dominate, while the story serves merely as a backdrop.

Yet just because Bittersweet Fu is heavy on illustrations doesn’t mean it’s an accessible work for everyone. The …

Another World was made during an era of PC gaming when single-creator works were still the norm. Rounabout the same year when Jordan Mechner was plumbing the depths of level design with the Prince of Persia, Eric Chahi was pushing the boundaries of narrative videogames with Another World. As Chahi declared at the project’s post-mortem at the recent Game Developers Conference, “I just knew I wanted to create a game with a cinematic feeling, with the theme of science fiction, in the rhythm of a movie.” And that he did, sleeplessly, for two years of his life.

Released 20 years …

In our carefully politically correct world, Sergeant Gerry Boyle (Brendan Gleeson) is a refreshingly cheeky change. Never one to suffer the word “paraplegic” when the word “spastic” will do, The Guard’s Sgt. Boyle is a loose cannon who just happens to work as a law enforcement officer –– specifically, a garda, the Gaelic word for guard. Mr. Gleeson, probably best known to the casual moviegoer as Alastor “Mad-Eye” Moody in the Harry Potter franchise, is a revelation in The Guard.

Apart from the odd joke dropped about the IRA or MI5, McDonagh does little to contextualize his film …

Hæxagon will be the most unique and unmatched video endeavor to be created within Hong Kong in recent years. With an estimated budget of HK$ 300,000 this post-apocalyptic themed short film dares to dwell into the Science Fiction genre. A genre that traditionally holds a vast fan base in Hong Kong but is hardly exploited by local filmmakers.

Hence, Hæxagon wants to fill a long vacant niche within Hong Kong’s filmic landscape and tries to go even further. Bringing Science Fiction elements into a jungle environment, mixed with ingredients of the 1970s doomsday exploitation. Brought to life by a crew …

The making and success of Scott Pilgrim are a sign that videogames really have infiltrated our popular consciousness. When captions such as “+9999 EXP” and “Level Up” are casually assigned to characters without explanation as punchlines, it presumes the audience understands the basic game framework of a hero gaining experience points through trials and subsequently leveling up their abilities when the accrued points hit a threshold. A mouthful to explain and, in the case of both Scott Pilgrim the comic and Scott Pilgrim the movie, a mouthful left unexplained for the unwitting members of the audience.

Originally produced as a …

Steve McQueen, a director with as rare a talent for visual lyricism as any working today, strikes new ore with his film Shame. His previous film, Hunger, assembled beautiful images within trademark long takes, and thus, achieved an excellent abstract formalism. As McQueen’s strength has always been optical delight, Shame employs a similar technique, yet his latest work marks a leap forward in terms of emotional impact.

This is the plot: Brandon (Michael Fassbender) is coping with unnamed past trauma through sex and shunning his family. Nevertheless, his sister Sissy (Carey Mulligan) arrives in his apartment requesting to …

Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, wrote, “A person’s a person, no matter how small.” Orz Boys director Yang Ya-Che certainly subscribes to this theory. The 2008 Taiwanese movie follows two young boys who everyone refers to as No. 1 and No. 2. (Except their frustrated teacher, who calls them Liar No. 1 and Liar No. 2.) Much like childhood itself, the film caroms from hilarity to hysteria, and is by turns fanciful, funny, and heartbreakingly serious. The emotional twists turns the characters experience will be familiar to anyone who was ever a child, but there are some elements …

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